Runescape games and her subsequent

  • Lauren Scott's father saw that trend developing even when Scott was just a girl, and he didn't want his daughter to have to play Runescape games that didn't represent her. So, he made a game himself, starring his own daughter, so that she would never feel like she didn't belong and wasn't a hero.This story devastated me. It's not that I thought Lauren Scott was lucky on the contrary, I think what she got was exactly what everyone should already have: The Old School RS Gold normalization of your own experiences and the ability to see someone like you succeeding. Just as Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman to travel in space, cited Star Trek 's Lieutenant Uhura as her inspiration, so too could Lauren Scott now cite this simple game made by her own father as a partial inspiration for her interest in Runescape games and her subsequent career choices.It's sadly still necessary for most people to see a bunch of studies that prove how pop culture affects people and changes their lives and minds and dreams, or perhaps a list of estimates that somehow prove diversifying media will increase a company's bottom line. But it should be so much simpler than that. It should be as simple as letting people grow up in a world where they can envision themselves succeeding, not failing, based on the evidence they see around them. This is a very simple solution that requires no less than a complete overhaul of absolutely everything. No wonder it's taking us so long. FRIDAY 10:00 AM → GDC Micro-TalksAnything that happens at 10 AM on the last day of GDC will have to do a lot to keep attention spans going, and this hour packed with ten smart micro-talks did the trick just barely. rsI was pretty tired. Forgive me, reader.rs Here are the highlights:Game critic rsand Paste contributorrs Lana Polansky gave a talk about videogame difficulty as a metaphor for capitalism and the bootstraps ethic; if you work hard enough in a game, you'll always come out on top, but how responsible is it for creators to include a lesson like that since real life doesn't work that way?